ORISHA ARTS

​BEAD GALLERY & BOUTIQUE

Orisha Oko 

Orisha Oko source of wealth

The one with children owns the world

Orisha Oko, let me give birth to mine

 

 

According to oral tradition, Orisha Oko is known as the Chief of Ìràwo. Before he was deified he is said to have been both a guinea fowl trapper and the progenitor of agricultural practices. Adepegba (1991) tells us that Orisha Oko worship is very popular among the agricultural workers to the North of Nigeria. Staffs from this region are readily identified as they are decorated with copper wound tightly around the handles of Oko’s staff. The copper symbolizes the crops, as the word for copper in Yorùbá is baba, also the name of the crop sorghum.

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IBEJI - TAIWO, KEHINDE, IDOWU

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The Ibeji ("To give birth to two") are known individually as Taiwo ("First to taste", the first twin born) and Kehinde ("Final to arrive", second born). They are the twin children of Shango and Oshun. In the tale that is told of their birth, Oshun considered herself too frivolous to raise children properly so She entrusted them to her mother, Yemaya / Yemoja.

 

They are the symbols of abundance and prosperity, and are unpar­alleled in their ability to bring riches to those who honor them. Twin births are miraculous, and the Ibeji represent our ability to perform miracles. With gratitude to their presence in the world, there is nothing that cannot be created by our hands. They bring us the ability to pick up a handful of dirt and create an empire. Inspired by the ache of the Ibeji, we set out to create a shelter and we build a palace.

ORISHA ARTS came up with the idea of making beautiful mazos for the Ibejis. They are made using the bead and color patterns for Yemaya and Shango, the twins' parents. We make a set of 4 pieces, consisting of 2 mazos for the pots/tinajas/soperas, and a matching pair for the Ibeji dolls. We can also make them to include a section for Oya, Oshun and Obatala, all of the orishas associated with the Ibeyi.

 

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